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Archive for the ‘News’ Category

08
Mar

Albuquerque Business First
By Candace Beeke, Publisher
PUBLISHED: Mar 8, 2017

As you have likely seen from your Facebook feed, today is International Women’s Day, and I am using this an opportunity to celebrate some remarkable women in our community.

Before I do that, I would offer my own personal experience in moving to Albuquerque nearly two years ago — I was surprised and pleased to see how many remarkable women are in leadership positions in our business community. From historically patriarchal industries, like finance, construction and energy, to some of our largest institutions, New Mexico has embraced high-performing women leaders.

And that’s not just a personal observation — it was borne out in Wallethub research that demonstrated New Mexico has the second highest female-to-male executive ratio after the District of Columbia. Unfortunately, overall New Mexico ranked very low for working moms in that report.

Here are a few women leaders you should know. Please join us April 3 as we celebrate more than 60 top women at our first Women’s Summit. The Summit begins with Mentoring Monday — a national event focused on advancing young women in business — followed by our longstanding Women of Influence Awards. It concludes with a brand-new Executive Leadership Roundtable session designed to help all of us be stronger leaders during challenging times. Join us for the whole day, if you can, or choose which events you can take part in.

1. Pat Vincent-Collawn, chairman, president and CEO, PNM Resources. Vincent-Collawn leads the largest utility and largest public company in the state and does so with a down-to-earth and accessible presence that surprises many. With $1.4 billion in 2015 revenue, PNM is a frequent newsmaker, including for rate increases and employee cuts and other tough subjects. It’s also received accolades for its work in securing the Facebook data center. Vincent-Collawn also serves as chair of the New Mexico Economic Development Partnership and is one of four vice chairs for the Edison Electric Institute, the largest utility trade association in the U.S.

2. Amy Coburn, director of planning, design and construction, University of New Mexico. Coburn is leading five major projects at UNM, totaling more than $170 million. In addition to her hefty day job, Coburn is leading the local chapter of the Urban Land Institute this year, making her one of five women leading commercial real estate-focused groups right now in New Mexico. With an extensive background in architecture and development, Coburn is a major force in rethinking UNM’s structures and traffic flows, which is a big part of how many people come to meet Albuquerque for the first time.

3. Michelle Franks, CFO, Studio Southwest Architects. Speaking of architects and further proving what a hyperconnected business community Albuquerque enjoys, Franks — one of this year’s Women of Influence— named developer and business owner Jeanie Springer-Knight as a mentor. Springer-Knight is one of the five women, along with Coburn, leading a commercial real estate organization in Albuquerque this year as she helms CREW. Franks also sits on the board of Studio Southwest, as well as on the board of Sandoval Economic Alliance. A graduate of New Mexico State University and UNM, Franks joined Studio Southwest in 1997, and became a principal in 2009.

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27
Feb

Rio Rancho Observer
By Antonio Sanchez, Staff Writer
PUBLISHED: Feb 27, 2017

A Corrales-based technology company was recognized during last week’s Sandoval Economic Alliance quarterly luncheon.

Ideum, a company that develops museum exhibit designs and multi-touch hardware and software, was named SEA’s “2016 Business of the Year” during Tuesday’s luncheon. The quarterly event, held at Santa Ana Star Center, was attended by more than 130 people. Previous recipients of the award include Cable ONE (2015) and DHF Technical Products (2014).

Ideum producer Cyndi Wood accepted the award on the behalf of the company’s founder and CEO, Jim Spadaccini, and thanked the company’s employees that had attended the event.

Last year, according to a short video Wood presented after accepting the award, Ideum provided touch-screen panels and displays for exhibits at Santa Fe’s Institute of American Indian Art, Hamline University, the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum, Mystic Seaport: The Museum of America and the Sea in Mystic, Ct., and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History.

Ideum also made interactive displays for Roy Street Café in Seattle and last year’s Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, providing an educational game that taught kids about hot-air balloons by allowing them to pilot a virtual balloon.

In other matters, Grant Taylor, director of communications and marketing for the New Mexico Association of Commerce and Industry, spoke about a few bills introduced during this year’s ongoing legislative session. Taylor said of the 425 pieces of legislation ACI has kept its attention on, they formally support 65 bills and are against 83 bills. Also, ACI considers 22 bills to be a high priority.

Taylor said ACI was against any bill proposed to raise the state’s minimum wage. Also, the organization was actively working to stop more than 20 bills that proposed raising taxes, he said.

House Bill 60, “Broadband Infrastructure Development” sponsored by Rep. Carl Trujillo and Sen. Jacob Candelaria, was considered to be among the organization’s top priorities for the year.

“The broadband bill is the belle of the ball,” Taylor said.

If approved, the bill would amend the state’s Local Economic Development Act to include broadband infrastructure development as a type of project eligible for LEDA funding.

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24
Feb

Albuquerque Journal
By Antonio Sanchez, Rio Rancho Observer Staff Writer
Published: Sat, Feb 25

A Corrales-based technology company has been named “2016 Business of the Year” by the Sandoval Economic Alliance.Ideum, a company that develops museum exhibit designs and multi-touch hardware and software, was recognized for the honor during SEA’s quarterly luncheon on Tuesday. The event, held at Santa Ana Star Center, was attended by more than 130 people. Previous recipients of the award include Cable ONE in 2015 and DHF Technical Products in 2014.

Ideum, a company that develops museum exhibit designs and multi-touch hardware and software, was recognized for the honor during SEA’s quarterly luncheon on Tuesday. The event, held at Santa Ana Star Center, was attended by more than 130 people. Previous recipients of the award include Cable ONE in 2015 and DHF Technical Products in 2014.

A made-for-fun sign indicating a touch-screen table stands nearby Ideum’s office in Corrales. (Antonio Sanchez/Rio Rancho Observer)
Ideum producer Cyndi Wood accepted the award on the behalf of the company’s founder and CEO, Jim Spadaccini, and thanked the company’s employees that had attended the event.Last year, according to a short video Wood presented after accepting the award, Ideum provided touch-screen panels and displays for exhibits at Santa Fe’s Institute of American Indian Art, Hamline University, the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum, Mystic Seaport: The Museum of America and the Sea in Mystic, Ct., and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History.

Last year, according to a short video Wood presented after accepting the award, Ideum provided touch-screen panels and displays for exhibits at Santa Fe’s Institute of American Indian Art, Hamline University, the Lowell Observatory in Flagstaff, the Sullivan Brothers Iowa Veterans Museum, Mystic Seaport: The Museum of America and the Sea in Mystic, Ct., and the Fort Worth Museum of Science and History.Ideum also made interactive displays for Roy Street Café in Seattle and last year’s Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, providing an educational game that taught kids about hot-air balloons by allowing them to pilot a virtual balloon.

Ideum also made interactive displays for Roy Street Café in Seattle and last year’s Albuquerque International Balloon Fiesta, providing an educational game that taught kids about hot-air balloons by allowing them to pilot a virtual balloon.

In other matters, Grant Taylor, director of communications and marketing for the New Mexico Association of Commerce and Industry, spoke about a few bills introduced during this year’s ongoing legislative session. Taylor said of the 425 pieces of legislation ACI has kept its attention on, they formally support 65 bills and are against 83 bills. Also, ACI considers 22 bills to be a high priority.

Taylor said ACI was against any bill proposed to raise the state’s minimum wage. Also, the organization was actively working to stop more than 20 bills that proposed raising taxes, he said.

House Bill 60, “Broadband Infrastructure Development” sponsored by Rep. Carl Trujillo, D-Santa Fe, and Sen. Jacob Candelaria, D-Albuquerque, was considered to be among the organization’s top priorities for the year.

“The broadband bill is the belle of the ball,” Taylor said.

If approved, the bill would amend the state’s Local Economic Development Act to include broadband infrastructure development as a type of project eligible for LEDA funding.

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21
Jan

Albuquerque Journal
By ABQJournal News Staff
PUBLISHED: Jan 21, 2017

Two Bernalillo-based businesses are expanding, and that means dozens of new jobs, owners say.Structural steel fabrication and manufacturing company Amfabsteel Inc. announced on Friday that it is adding 43 new positions as part of its expansion of operations. And, under the same ownership, Phat Steel Inc. announced that it is adding 20 jobs.

Structural steel fabrication and manufacturing company Amfabsteel Inc. announced on Friday that it is adding 43 new positions as part of its expansion of operations. And, under the same ownership, Phat Steel Inc. announced that it is adding 20 jobs.“Amfabsteel and Phat Steel are excited about the growth we are experiencing,” Mark Mosher, the president of the companies, said in a news release issued jointly

“Amfabsteel and Phat Steel are excited about the growth we are experiencing,” Mark Mosher, the president of the companies, said in a news release issued jointly with Sandoval Economic Alliance. “We’ve been able to sustain our growth by constantly looking to improve our processes and lead the industry in innovation.”Amfabsteel will receive $608,868 in state job-training funds, which go toward classroom or on-the-job training for up to six months, while Phat Steel will receive $168,374.

Amfabsteel will receive $608,868 in state job-training funds, which go toward classroom or on-the-job training for up to six months, while Phat Steel will receive $168,374.The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act program will also help Amfabsteel and Phat Steel with workforce development.

The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act program will also help Amfabsteel and Phat Steel with workforce development.

“It has been a pleasure to work with Mark and his companies to secure incentives to aid their expansions,” Bob Preble, director of business development at Sandoval Economic Alliance, said in a statement. “Homegrown businesses like Amfabsteel and Phat Steel bolster our local economy by investing in growing their workforce locally.”Amfabsteel, which was established in 1984, has 59 employees and more than 30,000 square feet of facilities, according to the release. Phat Steel Inc., a miscellaneous

Amfabsteel, which was established in 1984, has 59 employees and more than 30,000 square feet of facilities, according to the release. Phat Steel Inc., a miscellaneous fabrication and manufacturing company, began in 2006 and employs 14 people. It has more than 10,000 square feet of facilities.

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12
Jan

Albuquerque Business First
By Rachel Sapin, Reporter
PUBLISHED: Jan 12, 2017

The keynote speaker and panelists at Albuquerque Business First’s Grow New Mexico Economic Outlook event on Jan. 12 said this year’s economic outlook has plenty of positives, despite the nation being overdue for a recession, interest rates poised to rise and New Mexico dealing with a $69 million deficit for the current budget year.”The probability of a recession in the next six months is very low,” said national economist and keynote speaker Dr. Eugenio J. Alemán, director and senior economist

“The probability of a recession in the next six months is very low,” said national economist and keynote speaker Dr. Eugenio J. Alemán, director and senior economist of Wells Fargo Securities, at the Albuquerque Convention Center Thursday.

But they were equally frank about big challenges the nation and New Mexico face in 2017.Here are five takeaways from a lively discussion on economic expectations for the nation and New Mexico this year.

Here are five takeaways from a lively discussion on economic expectations for the nation and New Mexico this year.1. Interest rates will continue to rise

1. Interest rates will continue to riseAlemán said the number of hireable workers is dwindling as the nation approaches “full employment,” and businesses have increased wages and salaries to compete for workers. He said the Federal Reserve will likely increase its benchmark interest rate even more this year after increasing it for the first time since 2008 last year.

Alemán said the number of hireable workers is dwindling as the nation approaches “full employment,” and businesses have increased wages and salaries to compete for workers. He said the Federal Reserve will likely increase its benchmark interest rate even more this year after increasing it for the first time since 2008 last year.

2. Consumer confidence has improved dramatically since the election

“My conclusion is people are really happy that Trump won,” said Alemán. “The consumer confidence index jumped to 113.7 in December [2016]. That’s the highest number since the early 2000s.” He said 2017 will also see continued good news for home sales nationally, particularly for housing starts, with 1.2 million potential new homeowners for the year and existing home sales remaining strong.

3. There is no recession on the horizon, yet

We are well into the economic cycle where the U.S. would typically be due for a recession (every seven years). But Alemán said consumer and market confidence has surged since the election. That enthusiasm paired with stable employment and strong growth in household disposable income should buoy national economic growth to 2.1 percent this year from 1.6 percent last year. But Aleman said a potential trade war with other countries could impact those growth prospects, because the U.S. economy is heavily reliant on global consumer trade for its economic health. He said trade wars do not necessarily cause depressions, but they can cause inflation. He said President Elect Donald Trump should tread carefully when it comes to trade agreements with Mexico. “Manufacturing in the U.S. and Mexico go in tandem,” he said. “If you affect Mexican manufacturing, you’re affecting several production processes in U.S. That is going to bring down the U.S. also.”

4. New Mexico’s energy industry will see growth in oil, natural gas and renewables, but challenges too

Panelist Alexis J. Street, who manages state government affairs for Chevron in Santa Fe, said OPEC production cuts are good news for New Mexico. “New Mexico has an incredible energy story and incredible momentum. Right now, we’re 7th in the nation for crude and natural gas production,” Street said. She said Chevron planned to triple production in the Permian Basin by 2020. She said the incoming administration’s actions on federal subsidies that support wind and solar are a concern for the energy industry this year. “If we decide to end that tax credit, wind may face challenges of being cost-competitive against other types of energy production,” she said.

5. What New Mexico can do to grow its population and increase its economic standing

“Prioritize education and infrastructure investment. They are critical components of our foundation as a state.” – Alexis Street
“Being able to be competitive with our wages [in New Mexico] is another challenge.” -Jose Garcia, general manager, Albuquerque Convention Center
“Create certainty around great tax benefits that puts us on par with other states. With the LEDA fund or JTIP, we need to keep investments in those programs.” -Jami Grindatto, president and CEO, Sandoval Economic Alliance

“Fostering competition in health care will slow inflationary growth.” -Dr. Martin Hickey, CEO, New Mexico Health Connections
Nearly 300 people attended the Grow New Mexico Economic Outlook event. Sponsors were Wells Fargo, the city of Albuquerque and Jaynes Corp.

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31
Dec

Rio Rancho Observer
By Rio Rancho Observer
PUBLISHED: Dec 31, 2016

We extend our best wishes for a happy, prosperous New Year in 2017 and hope all of our readers have enjoyed a great, safe holiday.

As one might gather from our recap in today’s paper of some of the top stories in our area from last year, it’s been an interesting ride. 2017 promises no less.

Best of luck to our state lawmakers — especially our area’s delegation — as they head into the session in a few weeks faced with some big-time budget issues and difficult decisions to make about what our state’s priorities should be. Among the local new faces are District 10 Sen. Candace Gould and District 23 Rep. Daymon Ely.

The Sandoval County Commission embarks on the new year with three new members — Rio Ranchoans Jay Block and Dave Heil representing districts 2 and 4, and District 5’s F. Kenneth Eichwald of Cuba. It marks the first time Rio Rancho has had three representatives — District 3’s Don Chapman is the other — on the five-member board.

Some unfinished business for the commission looms, including consideration of an oil-and-gas ordinance that’s been in the works the past year since SandRidge Energy proposed drilling an exploratory well west of the city of Rio Rancho.

SandRidge, of course, withdrew its request for a zone change, but prudently, the county has carried on preparing the draft.

We look forward to see where the county will go next on the economic development front. Its focus on the topic spawned a study in 2014 that cited the need to create 18,000 jobs over the next decade to keep the county economically healthy, and also helped lead to the creation of the Sandoval Economic Alliance.

The City of Rio Rancho is a partner in this as well and our hope is 2017 will be a breakout year.

Not all was encouraging in 2016. What the future holds for the Intel plant isn’t publicly known. Hilltop and Country Club plazas lost major tenants in the past year in Hastings and Albertsons. Redevelopment of the old City Hall area hasn’t yet materialized. The community was struck a real blow with the reported closing of Club Rio Rancho.

But on the bright side, the city saw some large call centers move into Rio Rancho in 2016 and continues to see development in the Unser corridor and Enchanted Hills area.

One might argue about the effect impact fees have on the prospects for new development, but our hope is the Rio Rancho Governing Body adopts a fair, but competitive, rate in the near future.

Recent road projects have been inconvenient, to be sure, but we’re pleased with the progress the city has made with the Sara rehab, Broadmoor extension and Idalia reconstruction. We look forward to completion of the High Resort project.

The ball is rolling. We think it can be a good year.

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08
Oct

Rio Rancho Observer
By Antonio Sanchez, Observer Staff Writer
PUBLISHED: Oct 8, 2016

BERNALILLO — More than 100 new jobs were announced last week as city and county officials recognized expansion efforts by businesses already in Sandoval County.

The announcement was made Monday at the El Zocalo Plaza and was organized by Sandoval County Office of Business Development and Tourism and the Sandoval Economic Alliance.

Ten businesses announced plans to expand, opening their doors to anywhere between two to 50 new jobs.

They are MCT Industries and Pfeifer Studio in Bernalillo; Insight Lighting, Gonstead Physical Medicine, Edit House Productions, MLS-ECS and the McDermott Athletic Center in Rio Rancho; Ideum in Corrales; Walatowa Timber in Jemez Pueblo; and Interfaith Leap in Pena Blanca.

MCT Industries, a designer and manufacturer of of integrated systems, metal products and mobile and mechanical systems plans the biggest expansion. Thaddeus Lucero of MCT said it will add 50 new jobs within the next five years and will expand its physical site by the end of the year.

Gonstead Physical Medicine followed MCT, announcing 30 new jobs at its site.

Bernalillo Mayor Jack Torres thanked SEA, saying it has helped push for job retention and expansion in Bernalillo and the county.

“Regionalism and partnerships are important for us to succeed,” Torres said. “The town’s been very fortunate.”

Torres said he was glad to see small businesses in the area expand, saying a company’s small improvements should never be overlooked.

“Sure, it’s OK to look for the grand slam, the Intels of the world, as it be, that hire lots of people from out of state, but so often we forget about those little businesses,” he said. “In a small community like ours, that’s what drives our economy, those are the people who push the economy forward day after day, month after month.”

Rio Rancho Mayor Gregg Hull, who was previously the president and CEO of Certified Packing and Crafting, said he understands the risk a company makes when deciding to expand.

“When you’re a small business, adding one employee can be an agonizing decision because you don’t know if you’re there yet,” he said. “You don’t know if you’re ready to make that commitment yet.”

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08
Oct

Albuquerque Journal
By Antonio Sanchez, Observer Staff Writer
PUBLISHED: Oct 8, 2016

More than 100 new jobs were announced last week as city and county officials recognized expansion efforts by businesses already in Sandoval County.
The announcement was made Monday at the El Zocalo Plaza, and was organized by the Sandoval County Office of Business Development and Tourism and the Sandoval Economic Alliance.

Ten businesses announced plans to expand, opening their doors to anywhere between two to 50 new jobs.
They are MCT Industries and Pfeifer Studio in Bernalillo; Insight Lighting, Gonstead Physical Medicine, Edit House Productions, MLS-ECS and the McDermott Athletic Center in Rio Rancho; Ideum in Corrales; Walatowa Timber in Jemez Pueblo; and Interfaith Leap in Peña Blanca.

More than 100 new jobs were announced last week as city and county officials recognized expansion efforts by businesses already in Sandoval County.
The announcement was made Monday at the El Zocalo Plaza, and was organized by the Sandoval County Office of Business Development and Tourism and the Sandoval Economic Alliance.

Ten businesses announced plans to expand, opening their doors to anywhere between two to 50 new jobs.
They are MCT Industries and Pfeifer Studio in Bernalillo; Insight Lighting, Gonstead Physical Medicine, Edit House Productions, MLS-ECS and the McDermott Athletic Center in Rio Rancho; Ideum in Corrales; Walatowa Timber in Jemez Pueblo; and Interfaith Leap in Peña Blanca.

MCT Industries, a designer and manufacturer of integrated systems, metal products, and mobile and mechanical systems plans the biggest expansion. Thaddeus Lucero of MCT said it will add 50 new jobs within the next five years and will expand its physical site by the end of the year.

Gonstead Physical Medicine followed MCT, announcing 30 new jobs at its site.

Bernalillo Mayor Jack Torres thanked the SEA, saying it has helped push for job retention and expansion in Bernalillo and the county.

“Regionalism and partnerships are important for us to succeed,” Torres said. “The town’s been very fortunate.”

Torres said he was glad to see small businesses in the area expand, saying a company’s small improvements should never be overlooked.

“Sure, it’s OK to look for the grand slam, the Intels of the world … that hire lots of people from out of state, but so often we forget about those little businesses,” he said. “In a small community like ours, that’s what drives our economy, those are the people who push the economy forward day after day, month after month.”

Rio Rancho Mayor Gregg Hull, who was previously the president and CEO of Certified Packing and Crafting, said he understands the risk a company makes when deciding to expand.

“When you’re a small business, adding one employee can be an agonizing decision because you don’t know if you’re there yet,” he said. “You don’t know if you’re ready to make that commitment yet.”

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04
Oct

Albuquerque Business First
By Joe Cardillo, Reporter
PUBLISHED: Oct 4, 2016

The state’s economic development department and local government agencies announced third quarter job growth Monday, and most of it came from local businesses according to a press release from the Sandoval Economic Alliance.

The biggest gain was 50 new positions with Bernalillo-headquartered MCT Industries, which specializes in manufacturing and machining for defense contractors.

Overall, job numbers for the quarter totaled 153, including 30 tied to Gonstead Physical Medicine in Rio Rancho, 10 at Walatowa Timber in Jemez Pueblo and seven with the fast growing Corrales-based Ideum, which doubled in size from 2013 to 2015.

Monday’s jobs announcement was unique in that it mostly centered on small business and locally-grown companies.

“We often celebrate large companies, but it’s the small businesses that are the engine of our economy,” said Dawnn Robinson, city councilor and deputy mayor for Rio Rancho. “Most of our employment, job expansion, and economic growth comes from existing business.”

Most of the companies announcing new jobs are also participating in state incentive programs, including the Local Economic Development Act fund, and the Job Training Incentive Program.

That follows a trend over the last several months of more New Mexico built companies accessing training and economic development incentives.
Tiffany Avery, director of marketing and communications for Sandoval Economic Alliance, said in an email interview that the organization has seen success working with businesses that previously might not have considered accessing state incentives.

“I think the county’s focus on business growth in the smaller and rural communities such as Corrales, Jemez and Pena Blanca has been a huge factor,” said Avery. “We are really focused on getting the word out to existing businesses that there are incentives, programs and support to help them grow, which has been a huge win for SEA.”

Antoinette Vigil, Business Development Manager for Sandoval County, says the county is focused on both educating business owners on incentives and making sure there are resources to help them crunch the numbers on things like debt capacity so they can make smart decisions when growing.

“While some of the incentives, programs and services are at the state level,” said Vigil, “unless enacted, induced or adopted at that local level, they aren’t useful or beneficial to the community that the local governing body governs … we all reach out to or respond to help one another-the overall goal is economic growth and understanding the short and long-term needs and abilities within.”

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15
Sep

Rio Rancho Observer
By Observer Staff
PUBLISHED: September 15, 2016

Sandoval Health Collaborative has been selected as one of 50 members of the HealthyCommunity50 in the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge to receive a $10,000 community seed award.

By participating in the challenge, Sandoval County is in the running to receive an initial prize to support its local program.

The challenge, a partnership of the Aetna Foundation, the American Public Health Association and the National Association of Counties, launched in April during National Public Health Week. It will award $1.5 million in prizes to small and mid-sized cities, counties and federally-recognized tribes that are able to show measurable change over the course of several years working with cross-sector partnerships to implement health innovations and data-driven solutions.

Hundreds of city governments, local municipalities, health departments, educational institutions and other public/private entities applied to be a part of the challenge.

The HealthyCommunity50 were chosen based on plans to improve the health of their communities in at least one of five domains: Healthy behaviors, community safety, built environment, social/economic factors and environmental exposures.

Through the challenge, Sandoval Health Collaborative hopes to help children and families adopt healthy behaviors.

“Our local goal is to engage children and their families in taking ownership of their health to help reduce growing trends of obesity and diabetes,” said Richard Draper, program manager for the collaborative.

Draper said the collaborative’s 10×10 health booklet project is the centerpiece of the effort. The booklet initially will be distributed to about 1,700 first-graders throughout the county to take home to their families to inform them about the county’s health resources.

The collaborative was formed last year to provide better health care opportunities and bring health care jobs to Sandoval County. It includes the two hospitals in the county – Presbyterian Rust Medical Center and the UNM Sandoval Regional Medical Center – Lovelace Westside Hospital, CNM, UNM West, Sandoval Economic Alliance, Rio Rancho and Bernalillo school districts, Rio Rancho Regional Chamber of Commerce, Unser Gateway Coalition and Presbyterian Medical Services.

“Through the Sandoval Health Collaborative, we have demonstrated that by working together, we can explore new ideas, from a variety of stakeholders, for improving the health of our community”, said Jamie Silva-Steele, collaborative co-chair and CEO and president of UNM Sandoval Regional Medical Center.

“We are honored to be one of 50 organizations selected for the Healthiest Cities & Counties Challenge,” said Angela Ward, collaborative co-chair and campus administrator at Presbyterian Rust Medical Center. “Healthcare today is increasingly complex— one of our goals at the Sandoval Health Collaborative is to help local residents navigate this difficult landscape. This award will help fund our efforts to improve health literacy and increase healthy outcomes for Sandoval County families.”

All selected HealthyCommunity50 members will be visited by an expert judge panel to answer questions, understand the community’s approach to the project first-hand and speak with the members of the cross-sector team and key stakeholders.

At the conclusion of the challenge, the programs most able to show measurable change will be eligible for prize awards from $25,000 to $500,000.

Participants will be judged on their own progress and will not be competing against each other. For more information, visit healthiestcities.org.

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